Pin It

Your critic lives in a subjectivity-based fantasy land 

San Luis Obispo

I normally respect, or at least tolerate, the subjectivity of theater critics. After all, we all see the world in our own unique way. It seems to me, though, considering the impact a critic may have on the tenuous and fragile world of art, that some measure of objectivity is required as well. In the world of baseball (which I used to play), for instance, nothing can destroy the worthwhileness of the game more than blind umpires.

In the case of your reviewer, Anna Weltner, she seems to be so mired in blind subjectivity that not a shred of objectivity remains. Her “review” (if it can be so dignified) of Grand Manner at the Pewter Plough Playhouse (“Not so grand Manner,” Sept. 6) certainly proves this beyond a doubt. It was so vicious and small-minded and so removed from the actual theater experience of the evening that I seriously question her credentials to have so much influence.

The evening that she was there, the audience obviously appreciated and enjoyed the production so much that the laughter was virtually nonstop, and, at the end, many of them were on the feet (applauding, not walking out). The brother of the playwright, who had the Lincoln Center production to compare it to, also said it was well done.

Ms. Weltner was either unconscious or in a world of her own.

Pin It


Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

Search, Find, Enjoy

Submit an event

More by Gene Strohl

Trending Now

© 2018 New Times San Luis Obispo
Powered by Foundation