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You just bought yourself another Saturday 

The social, demented, and just plain sad, are on stage in A.G.

click to enlarge I HEART JOHN HUGHES :  The Breakfast Club, the mother of all Saturday high school detention movies (it’s almost 25 years old!), makes its way to the stage at 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 7 p.m. on Sundays through Feb. 22 at the Studio Black Box Theatre, 116 W. Branch St. in Arroyo Grande. Tickets cost $12 to $15, or $25 gets you wine or beer too. Info: 473-0377 or thestudioofperformingarts.com. - IMAGE COURTESY OF SHANNON LOWRIE
  • IMAGE COURTESY OF SHANNON LOWRIE
  • I HEART JOHN HUGHES : The Breakfast Club, the mother of all Saturday high school detention movies (it’s almost 25 years old!), makes its way to the stage at 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 7 p.m. on Sundays through Feb. 22 at the Studio Black Box Theatre, 116 W. Branch St. in Arroyo Grande. Tickets cost $12 to $15, or $25 gets you wine or beer too. Info: 473-0377 or thestudioofperformingarts.com.

New Times Who are you?

Shannon Lowrie I’m the director of The Breakfast Club and the owner of the Studio Black Box Theatre and one of the teachers as well … and artistic director of Studio Players. Jake [McGuire] and I take turns directing.

New Times
How did this production come about? By the way, I love the concept.

Lowrie We did a stage production about eight years ago at the studio in Arroyo Grande. ... Since we’ve closed it, we have been really wanting to do it again. Back then we did it as a tribute to the movie. We did it exactly like the movie, so this time we did a modernized version, because I feel like it’s timeless, although the characters [in this production] are different, the subject matter still pertains to today ... to high school kids today. And a lot of high school kids have never seen The Breakfast Club, so it was a good idea to throw the truth in their faces a little bit.

New Times Who is coming to see the show?

Lowrie It’s been half high-school students and half people in their 30s, who were in high school when the movie came out in the ’80s.

New Times How did you modernize it?

Lowrie As far as the characters, three of the kids who are in the play are actually in high school so we talked about what a jock would be perceived as today, because it’s different than what it was in the 1980s. And the character who plays the basket case; we made her goth. And the hardest two characters were the brain and the criminal. We worked really hard to not make it superficial and over the top. We wanted to stay realistic. We modernized the vocabulary too, as far as bringing the slang up to date.

New Times Did you write a new script?

Lowrie Yes, a little bit. It’s adapted for the stage.

New Times How long does the show run?

Lowrie It’s really fast-paced and it runs about an hour and 45 minutes.
 
New Times What is your favorite line from the show, one that resonates with you?

Lowrie I don’t know why I like this part: “Bury your head in the sand and wait for your fucking prom.” For me, it’s something I would have liked to have said to someone when I was in high school. I was more like the basket case than the prom queen. And people don’t say things like that to each other...although we would like to.
 
Jake McGuire, 26, plays Bender, a timeless character—part bully, part criminal.

New Times What is your acting history?

McGuire I’ve been professionally training as an actor, singer and dancer for the past 15 years. I started my career right here at the Studio of Performing Arts and have gone on to study at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in Pasadena, and I’ve worked for numerous off-Broadway houses in New York City.
 
New Times How did you prepare for the role on stage that Judd Nelson made famous in the movie version of The Breakfast Club?

McGuire To prepare for the role there wasn’t too much work that went into it this time. I played the role seven years ago and at that time I kind of was Bender in many ways. I can relate to his temper and his sense of sarcasm very well. Bender’s real tough on the outside but he’s really a softy when you get past all the bullshit.
 
Christy Heron wishes she had just the interest John Hughes has made from the Home Alone movies in her bank account. Make a donation at cheron@newtimesslo.com.

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