Pin It
Favorite

Local abstract painter Christine Marie presents Space & Time, a new collection on display at SLO Provisions with a June 5 opening reception 

Christine Marie wears a lot of hats. She's a creative entrepreneur and Mission Women's Business Center consultant, a curator, and contemporary artist whose new exhibition of abstract paintings called Space & Time is on display at SLO Provisions through June. This Saturday, June 5, you're invited to an opening reception as part of Art After Dark from 5 to 8 p.m. (1255 Monterey St., SLO).

Her paintings are bursting with color and texture—works that will evoke a personal reaction in each individual viewer. She engaged in an email interview with New Times, explaining her take on abstract expressionism, a post-World War II art movement that had its start in New York City.

click to enlarge PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST Christine Marie will be at SLO Provisions on June 5, from 5 to 8 p.m., for an artist reception for her new collection, Space & Time. - PHOTO COURTESY OF NICOLE MARIE
  • Photo Courtesy Of Nicole Marie
  • PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST Christine Marie will be at SLO Provisions on June 5, from 5 to 8 p.m., for an artist reception for her new collection, Space & Time.

New Times: First, some quick questions. Where on the Central Coast did you grow up?

Christine Marie: I lived in Los Osos throughout high school and moved away after graduation.

NT: You left for SoCal but returned. Why?

CM: My most recent return to the Central Coast in 2015 was upon the diagnosis of what was considered a rare combination of thyroid disorders. An awful combination of Hoshimoto's and Graves' diseases kicked off an intense chapter that brought me home to be closer to family and a specialist. I am so grateful to have received treatment, had an opportunity to heal, and reimagine the possibilities of my life. Painting and the performing arts have been a huge source of positivity and healing throughout this journey.

NT: Are you a trained artist or self-taught?

CM: Mostly self-taught. I made some adjustments to my life a couple of years ago in an effort to continue challenging myself to elevate my work and learn new skills and techniques; this included several workshops over the last 1.5 years.

NT: Who are your artist heroes?

click to enlarge VOYAGE Christine Marie hopes that views of her art will "elicit a self-guided journey that evokes emotion and thought through the utilization of color and texture, with the hope that the experience be completely unique to the viewer." - IMAGE COURTESY OF CHRISTINE MARIE
  • Image Courtesy Of Christine Marie
  • VOYAGE Christine Marie hopes that views of her art will "elicit a self-guided journey that evokes emotion and thought through the utilization of color and texture, with the hope that the experience be completely unique to the viewer."

CM: I admire all of these artists for innumerable reasons ranging from content, style, and technique to their community impact and how they show up in the world: Mark Rothko, Camille Rose Garcia, Nino Yuniardi, Alice Sheridan, Louise Fletcher, and Nicholas Wilton.

NT: Now for a longwinded question. Li'l Abner cartoonist Al Capp said of abstract art, it's "a product of the untalented sold by the unprincipled to the utterly bewildered." This represents perfectly how misunderstood abstract art is, art that abstract painter and Hofstra University art professor Laurie Fendrich called "the most difficult to understand and seemingly irrelevant kind of painting that exists." Of course, Fendrich doesn't believe that. She speaks of abstract art's "Little Hidden Meaning," about enabling us "to be quiet," to counter "our society's glut of things," and perhaps more importantly to be "quite simply beautiful." What's your take on abstract art? Why are you drawn to it?

CM: One could say that it has chosen me. It feels more like an old spiritual language that comes from deep within my soul. It's the convergence of the intrinsic and extrinsic—the internal and external. Abstract art is a form of freedom for the painter and viewer to observe the work and how it translates through the lens of memories, experiences, and emotions: of what is or what isn't in the realm of possibilities of our individual psyche and imagination—the tangible and intangible. Abstract art takes you on a journey by challenging the boundaries of perception. It invites you to dig deeper, find the story or connect with the soul, search for meaning, or to quiet the mind to engage in an immersive experience by allowing an innate psychological or physiological response to occur.

NT: Arshile Gorky said, "Abstraction allows man to see with his mind what he cannot physically see with his eyes. Abstract art enables the artist to perceive beyond the tangible, to extract the infinite out of the finite. It is the emancipation of the mind. It is an explosion into unknown areas." What sort of people do you think are drawn to abstract art, and why do so many people seem to reject it?

click to enlarge TRANSCENDENCE Many of Christine Marie's paintings don't have titles, but she said, "Occasionally, during the process of creation, a title reveals itself to me." - IMAGE COURTESY OF CHRISTINE MARIE
  • Image Courtesy Of Christine Marie
  • TRANSCENDENCE Many of Christine Marie's paintings don't have titles, but she said, "Occasionally, during the process of creation, a title reveals itself to me."

CM: It's been my experience that people that are drawn to abstract art tend to have a curious nature. They tend to be open to new ideas, places, people, experiences, and exploring the known and unknowns of life and the world and perceptions of it. Some people aren't quite sure why they're drawn to it, and others enjoy the evolution of the interaction that unfolds over time.

NT: Why do so many people reject abstract art?

CM: Art is a very personal thing. You could spend a lot of time trying to understand why people prefer one genre over another, but in a way it's also the point of art. Part of its beauty is in the diversity and the incredible feeling you get when you find a work of art that you connect with.

NT: Robert Motherwell said, "Nothing as drastic an innovation as abstract art could have come into existence, save as the consequence of a most profound, relentless, unquenchable need. The need is for felt experience—intense, immediate, direct, subtle, unified, warm, vivid, rhythmic." What do you hope people feel or experience when they view your art?

click to enlarge UNTITLED Do you see clouds, a snowstorm, flowers? Abstract art triggers memories and emotions in its viewers, to, as Arshile Gorky said, allow a person to "see with his mind what he cannot physically see with his eyes." - IMAGE COURTESY OF CHRISTINE MARIE
  • Image Courtesy Of Christine Marie
  • UNTITLED Do you see clouds, a snowstorm, flowers? Abstract art triggers memories and emotions in its viewers, to, as Arshile Gorky said, allow a person to "see with his mind what he cannot physically see with his eyes."

CM: During the creative process, it's always my intention to elicit a self-guided journey that evokes emotion and thought through the utilization of color and texture, with the hope that the experience be completely unique to the viewer and based on the internal relational response ignited by the colors, textures, and composition of each painting. Occasionally, during the process of creation, a title reveals itself to me, but it's not uncommon to have an internal dialogue that accompanies the approach to naming the work—a push-pull resistance to a title that potentially influences the viewer's perception and experience. Δ

Contact Senior Staff Writer Glen Starkey at gstarkey@newtimesslo.com.

Tags:

Pin It
Favorite

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

Search, Find, Enjoy

Submit an event

© 2021 New Times San Luis Obispo
Powered by Foundation