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Film Listings 1/25/18 – 2/1/18 

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME

What's it rated? R

Where's it showing? The Palm

It's the summer of 1983 in the north of Italy, and Elio Perlman (Timothée Chalamet), a precocious 17-year-old American-Italian, spends his days in his family's 17th century villa transcribing and playing classical music, reading, and flirting with his friend Marzia (Esther Garrel). Elio enjoys a close relationship with his father (Michael Stuhlbarg), an eminent professor specializing in Greco-Roman culture, and his mother, Annella (Amira Casar), a translator. One day, Oliver (Armie Hammer), a charming American scholar working on his doctorate, arrives as the annual summer intern tasked with helping Elio's father. Amid the sun-drenched splendor of the setting, Elio and Oliver discover the heady beauty of awakening desire over the course of a summer that will alter their lives forever. (130 min.)

—Sony Pictures Classics

THE COMMUTER

What's it rated? PG-13

What's it worth? Rental

Where's it showing? Stadium 10

It seems like director Jaume Collet-Serra and actor Liam Neeson have a thing going on. First there was Unknown (2011) about a guy whose identity is stolen and he has to thwart an assassination, then there was Non-Stop (2014) about an air marshal thwarting an in-flight extortion scheme, then there was Run All Night (2015) about a mob guy who has to thwart his boss's attempt to murder his son, and now there's The Commuter about a supposedly mild-mannered insurance salesman who has to thwart the assassination of a witness on a train.

Yes, Michael MacCauley (Neeson) has a very particular set of skills, but one of them isn't making The Commuter as good as Taken (2008), which Collet-Serra and Neeson seem to be chasing over and over without success.

Sure, The Commuter is a serviceable action thriller, but it never quite reaches Neeson's best action efforts like Taken or The Grey. It begins by establishing MacCauley as a committed family man who dutifully takes the commuter train in to New York every day to sell insurance out of his office in a big high rise. He's unexpectedly fired one day. Safely on the train back to the 'burbs, MacCauley meets Joanna (Vera Farmiga), who tells him he can make $100,000 if he can locate a train passenger "who doesn't belong," carrying a bag she wants him to mark with a GPS device. Incredulous, MacCauley finds—as directed—a $25,000 down payment in the restroom and begins to work his powers of detection, but things turn sinister quickly as Joanna threatens MacCauley's family if he doesn't succeed.

The film requires some serious suspension of disbelief to keep your eyes from rolling in your head. It's pretty ridiculous, but considering the straight-to-video dreck out there, The Commuter isn't terrible, but neither is it inspired. (105 min.)

—Glen Starkey

DARKEST HOUR

What's it rated? PG-13

What's it worth? Full Price

Where's it showing? The Palm

Pick

Darkest Hour drops viewers into one of the tensest, grimmest periods of World War II to illustrate how British Prime Minister Winston Churchill (Garry Oldman), orated Britain and its people out of surrendering to and into defiantly fighting Nazi Germany.

Essentially a biographical portrait of Churchill, Darkest Hour leans on a phenomenal performance by Oldman to captivate the audience and make us feel the immensity of Europe teetering on the edge of destruction.

Set in May of 1940, British Parliament has just ousted Neville Chamberlain as its Prime Minister as Hitler prepares to invade Belgium and Holland. Churchill is begrudgingly appointed as his successor, but fear and doubt still consumes the nation.

Churchill assumes the helm with the message to the nation that accepting defeat isn't an option. But he faces resistance from many members of Parliament and even members of his own cabinet, who bicker with him to settle a peace treaty with Hitler, as millions of British soldiers' lives are on the line. It's Churchill's commitment to the principles of his country and disdain for the moral atrocities of Nazism that compel him to push back against the momentum of a surrender. That's what's thrilling about this movie: the emotional battle between the convenience of giving up versus the profound consequences of that concession.

Darkest Hour hits theaters at an appropriate time in history, when similar moral questions and human values are on the line. Churchill's bluster and bombastic oration did remind me of President Donald Trump's. But the push notification that arrived on my phone in the theater reporting Trump's tweet to North Korea of having a "working" nuclear button on his desk enlightened me to the fact that the intelligence, consciousness, and nuance of Churchill's rhetoric has no comparison to the current U.S. president. (125 minutes).

—Peter Johnson

DEN OF THIEVES

What's it rated? R

Where's it showing? Stadium 10, Park

Every day, $120 million in cash is taken out of circulation and destroyed by the Los Angeles Branch of the Federal Reserve—unless a notorious, elite crew of bank robbers can pull off the ultimate heist and get to the money first ... right under the noses of LA's most feared division in law enforcement. (140 min.)

—STX Entertainment

GET OUT

What's it rated? PG-13

What's it worth? Full price

Where's it showing? Downtown Centre

Pick

In his directorial debut, actor-writer Jordan Peele (Keanu, Key and Peele, Rubberhead, MADtv) helms this mystery-horror film about a young African-American man named Chris Washington (Daniel Kaluuya), who's in a mixed-race relationship with his white girlfriend Rose Armitage (Allison Williams), who decides it's time for him to meet her parents—Dean (Bradley Whitford) and Missy (Catherine Keener)—so they head to her family's estate. When they arrive, he discovers the area's black residents behave in bizarre ways, and when he's warned to "get out," he discovers it's not so easy to leave.

The gore was convincing, the acting roundly competent, and the story fresh enough not to wallow in horror and mystery cliché. Currently, the film has a 99 percent critic rating on rottentomatoes.com, and I can see why. I'll remember this film. (103 min.)

—Glen Starkey

THE GREATEST SHOWMAN

What's it rated? PG

What's it worth? Rental

Where's it showing? Downtown Centre, Stadium 10, Park, Galaxy

First-time director Michael Gracey helms The Greatest Showman, an original, straight-to-screen musical inspired by the life of P.T. Barnum (played here by Hugh Jackman) and the formation of the Barnum and Bailey Circus. The film never claims to be wholly factual and only uses the aspects of Barnum's life that fit into its desired rags-to-riches structure.

Overall, The Greatest Showman is a mixed bag full of flawed and fun moments alike. It's hard to tell how serious it takes itself at times, but the best parts are the unashamedly cheesy ones. And I really wish it embraced that cheesiness more—it could have been grater. (139 min.)

—Caleb Wiseblood

HOSTILES

click to enlarge WILD WEST An American army captain must escort a dying Cheyenne war chief back to tribal lands in Hostiles. - PHOTO COURTESY OF ENTERTAINMENT STUDIOS MOTION PICTUES
  • Photo Courtesy Of Entertainment Studios Motion Pictues
  • WILD WEST An American army captain must escort a dying Cheyenne war chief back to tribal lands in Hostiles.

What's it rated?R

Where's it showing?Downtown Centre, Stadium 10, Park, Galaxy

New

Set in 1892, Hostiles tells the story of a legendary Army captain (Christian Bale), who after stern resistance, reluctantly agrees to escort a dying Cheyenne war chief (Wes Studi) and his family back to tribal lands. Making the harrowing and perilous journey from Fort Berringer, an isolated Army outpost in New Mexico, to the grasslands of Montana, the former rivals encounter a young widow (Rosamund Pike), whose family was murdered on the plains. Together, they must join forces to overcome the punishing landscape, hostile Comanche, and vicious outliers that they encounter along the way. (135 min.)

—Entertainment Studios Motion Pictures

INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY

What's it rated? PG-13

Where's it showing? Sunset Drive In

Adam Robitel helms the fourth entry of the Insidious series, with Insidious: Chapter 3 director Leigh Whannell providing the script, centering around parapsychologist Elise Rainier (Lin Shaye) and her continued voyage into the "further." (103 min.)

—Universal Pictures

I, TONYA

What's it rated? R

What's it worth? Full Price

Where's it showing? Galaxy

Pick

From director Craig Gillespie (Lars and the Real Girl, The Finest Hours) and writer Steven Rogers (P.S. I love You, Friday Night Lights) comes I, Tonya, based on unbelievable, but true events. This film is a darkly comedic tale of American figure skater, Tonya Harding (Margot Robbie), and one of the most sensational scandals in sports history. Though Harding was the first American woman to complete a triple axel in competition, her legacy was forever defined by her association with an infamous, ill conceived, and even more poorly executed attack on fellow Olympic competitor Nancy Kerrigan (Caitlin Carver). The cast is rounded out with a mustachioed Sebastian Stan as Harding's impetuous ex-husband Jeff Gillooly and Allison Janney as her acid-tongued mother, LaVona Golden.

Here's the gist of the scandal for viewers who may not remember: leading up to the 1994 Olympics, Tonya's ex-husband Jeff and his friend Shawn Eckhardt (Paul Walter Houser) conspired to hire another guy to hit Harding's competitor Kerrigan in the back of the knees with a metal pipe. Harding's involvement in or awareness of this plan varies depending on whose story you believe.

Working off a reality that is already pretty out there, I, Tonya presents a dramatic mock-u-mentary retelling of these real life events. The screenplay is closely inspired by interviews done with the real people involved in the saga, including Tonya herself. The result is spellbinding. Gillespie and Rogers succeed in not only giving us a peek into Harding's formative years and mind, they pull the whole dang curtain back on the admittedly messed up world of competitive ice-skating. Robbie brings a fiery intensity to the complex Tonya that will surely land her an Oscar. By the time the credits roll, you may or may not be on Tonya's side, but odds are you'll empathize with the self-proclaimed redneck who really never got a fair shake at much in life.

The tragic thing about Tonya is I think she could have persevered past the personal stuff in her life, but it was the U.S. Figure Skating Association's rejection that really got to her. We see a glimmer of hope when a young Tonya falls in love with Jeff, but a few months in he starts beating her. The two eventually marry when Tonya is just 19, setting the stage for Harding to leave Jeff time and time again, even reuniting with her abuser after divorcing him.

Upon confronting a judge about her skating scores, Harding is told that she just doesn't have the wholesome family image the association is looking for. In the smallest, saddest voice, Harding responds with, "Why can't it just be about the skating?" I want to take a moment to remind everyone that Tonya was the first woman in the U.S. and the second in the world, to land a triple axel. Girl had skills. But what audiences came for is the sheer madness that unfolds in the second half of the film. After a threat is called into the ice skating rink where Tonya is set to compete, Jeff has the bright idea to send anonymous, threatening letters to Nancy to throw her off her game. Jeff's BFF/Tonya's bodyguard Shaun somehow gets involved and takes over, hiring two of his guys. A bad idea turns into an even worse idea, and things spin wildly out of control, but the most unbelievable aspect of this tabloid tale is just how much the story's villains accomplished, in spite of crippling stupidity.

I, Tonya takes someone from popular culture we thought we had the measure of, and throws all of our ideas out the window. (119 min.)

—Ryah Cooley

JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE

What's it rated? PG-13

What's it worth? Full Price

Where's it showing? Downtown Centre, Stadium 10, Park, Galaxy

Pick

With Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle, we see an old game through new lenses. In present day, we have a group of four archetypal teenagers. You know, similar to The Breakfast Club you've got the nerd Spencer (Alex Wolff), his former best-friend-turned-jock Fridge (Ser'Darius Blain), a self-absorbed popular Bethany (Madison Iseman), and smart girl Martha (Morgan Turner) who's a little salty about her peers. The crew gets detention in an abandoned classroom filled with old-school memorabilia. That's where the unlikely group finds Jumanji (this time in video game form). Once the game is plugged in and rebooting, the kids are sucked into the console, entering the Jumanji world. But there's a catch: They have assumed the bodies of their avatars.

This is where the fun really starts. Spencer turns into Dr. Smolder Bravestone (Dwayne Johnson). His weakness: He has none. Fridge turns into Franklin "Mouse" Finbar (Kevin Hart). You can only guess where the nickname comes from. Notorious hottie Bethany turns into the nerdy, male Professor "Shelly" Oberon (Jack Black), a cartographer, cryptographer, archaeologist, and paleontologist. Shy Martha turns into Ruby Roundhouse (Karen Gillan). She's a martial artist and dance fighter. With their new personas, the group must learn to work together to return the jewel known as the Jaguar's Eye to the jaguar statue.

This film does what many remakes fail to do, which is successfully entertain its audience. These actors did a hilarious job delivering as prepubescent teenagers in way over their heads. Johnson and Hart bounce off each other perfectly—no I'm not tired of the height difference jokes; it worked out well here. Outlandish Black can hold his own in a scene, and newcomer Gillian hilariously portrays a geeky teenager. I was laughing nonstop throughout the film. (112 min.)

—Karen Garcia

LADY BIRD

What's it rated? R

What's it worth? Full Price

Where's it showing? Downtown Centre

Pick

Writer-director Greta Gerwig helms this coming of age story about high schooler Christine "Lady Bird" McPherson (Saoirse Ronan) over the 2002-03 school year in Sacramento, exploring her difficult relationship with her mother Marion (Laurie Metcalf) and others in her life. (93 min.)

—Glen Starkey

MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE

click to enlarge INFILTRATE In Maze Runner: The Death Cure, Thomas (Dylan O'Brien, center) and his group of escaped Gladers must break into what may be the deadliest maze of all in order to find answers. - PHOTO COURTESY OF 20TH CENTURY FOX
  • Photo Courtesy Of 20th Century Fox
  • INFILTRATE In Maze Runner: The Death Cure, Thomas (Dylan O'Brien, center) and his group of escaped Gladers must break into what may be the deadliest maze of all in order to find answers.

What's it rated?PG-13

Where's it showing?Downtown Centre, Sunset Drive In, Stadium 10, Park, Galaxy

New

In the epic finale to the Maze Runner saga, Thomas (Dylan O'Brien) leads his group of escaped Gladers on their final and most dangerous mission yet. To save their friends, they must break into the legendary Last City, a WCKD-controlled labyrinth that may turn out to be the deadliest maze of all and get answers to the questions the Gladers have been asking since they first arrived in the maze. (114 min.)

—20th Century Fox

PHANTOM THREAD

What's it rated? R

Where's it showing? The Palm, Stadium 10, Galaxy

See Split Screen.

PADDINGTON 2

What's it rated? PG

Where's it showing? Galaxy

While searching for the perfect present for his beloved Aunt Lucy's (Imelda Staunton) hundredth birthday, Paddington (Ben Whishaw) spots a unique pop-up book in Mr. Gruber's (Jim Broadbent) antique shop, and embarks upon a series of odd jobs to buy it. But when the book is stolen, it's up to Paddington and the Brown family to unmask the thief. (105 min.)

—Warner Bros. Pictures

THE POST

What's it rated? PG-13

What's it worth? Full Price

Where's it showing? Downtown Centre, Stadium 10, Bay, Park, Galaxy

Pick

Steven Spielberg (Jaws, The Color Purple, Schindler's List, Saving Private Ryan, Lincoln) directs this true story about Kay Graham (Meryl Streep), the first female newspaper publisher, and tenacious editor Ben Bradlee (Tom Hanks), who join forces to reveal a government cover-up spanning five presidencies. Written by Liz Hannah and Josh Singer, the film also stars Sarah Paulson as Tony Bradlee, Bob Odenkirk as Ben Bagdikian, Tracy Letts as Fritz Beebe, Bradley Whitford as Arthur Parsons, Bruce Greenwood as Robert McNamara, and Matthew Rhys as famed whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg.

Like All the President's Men (1976), The Paper (1994), and the documentary Page One (2011), The Post celebrates the Fourth Estate, reminding viewers that—as Justice Hugo Black said—"The press was to serve the governed, not the governors." In addition to being a story about the importance of journalism, it's also a story of the burgeoning feminist movement and one woman's struggle to keep her family paper afloat.

It's the early '70s and Nixon is president; his actual tapes are used in the film, lending an important element of realism. Kay Graham works in a man's world. She's frequently the only woman in a room full of men, and though they know she's the boss, she's second guessed and pandered too.

Her sphere of influence reaches a fevered pitch when her paper feels like it's playing catch-up to the New York Times, which is publishing the so-called Pentagon Papers, which chronicle an ongoing government cover-up about the Vietnam War. When the Justice Department brings a court injunction against the Times, threatening criminal charges if they continue to publish, The Post gets a shot at continuing to tell truth to power when its investigative journalist Ben Bagdikian gets ahold of Daniel Ellsberg's papers. Kay knows if she publishes, The Post may fall to criminal charges.

Spielberg is a superlative director, not as showy as some, but great at building tension in the small moments and letting his actors carry the weight of scenes, and what amazing actors! Streep is a revelation, displaying Kay's internal struggle with the lightest of expressions, yet we know exactly what she's going through. Hanks plays Bradlee with the brash confidence of someone more committed to journalistic integrity than with keeping his job.

As far as The Post is concerned, I see Oscar nominations on the horizon. This is great filmmaking! (116 min.)

—Glen Starkey

THE SHAPE OF WATER

What's it rated? R

What's it worth? Full Price

Where's it showing? The Palm, Stadium 10, Park, Galaxy

Pick

Elisa (Sally Hawkins) is a lonely mute who works as a janitor in a high-security government laboratory in 1962 Baltimore. For 10 years she's walked and cleaned the halls of the facility with her friend Zelda (Octavia Spencer), with Zelda doing all of the talking about her hardworking, yet lazy, husband. Men, am I right?

Every day Elisa sticks to her routine: take a shower, polish her shoes, make lunch as well as a meal for her neighbor and friend Giles (Richard Jenkins), and then catch the bus to work. While she can't say anything, her actions make up for the silence—she also communicates using sign language—and she's a thoughtful individual. She often spends her time scanning the TV Guide with Giles, a closeted gay man, and watching old films with elaborate tales of love, something both are yearning for.

Her life takes a turn when she and Zelda are called into a room to clean up a bloody mess created by "the asset" (Doug Jones), at least that's what the scientists and government officials are calling it. The asset is a scaled creature from South Africa that now resides in a water tank against its will. Elisa is drawn to the creature, maybe because she too is an outsider in the world that she lives in. She forms a bond with the creature that feels more like love than friendship. But her days of sharing hard-boiled eggs for lunch and listening to her vinyl record player are numbered; the very fate of the creature is on the line.

The film also has Del Toro's signature, uniquely horrifying creatures, hence the asset with his scaly body and fish-like eyes. But while he's a bit scary to look at, he has the emotions and thoughts that any human would. That's what Elisa is drawn to, especially since they both can't talk. Elisa takes comfort in this creature because he can't see that she's different from other humans. It's a beautifully told film of finding some sort of compassion in an otherwise mundane world.

What I loved about The Shape of Water is that it's very whimsical. It reminds me of Amelie, a simple individual living an extraordinary life without her knowledge. Hawkins does an amazing job of portraying this shy woman fierce enough to overstep boundaries for a noble cause. Don't get me wrong, this isn't just a love story, guys; there's also plenty of action and drama to keep you on your toes. I'll leave you with this: The end was a splashing twist that I wasn't predicting at all. (123 min.)

—Karen Garcia

STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI

What's it rated? PG-13

What's it worth? Full Price

Where's it showing? Galaxy

Pick

In Star Wars: The Last Jedi, writer/director Rian Johnson (Looper, Brick) continues the Skywalker saga as the heroes of The Force Awakens join the galactic legends in an epic adventure that unlocks age-old mysteries of the Force.

What's interesting about the latest chapter in the saga is the connection that Rey (Daisy Ridley) is building with the force. While it's thought that Luke (Mark Hamil) is the last Jedi needed to save the Rebellion, let's be real: There are great forces of power within Rey and Kylo Ren (Adam Driver). Rey seeks Luke not only for his help with the fight against the First Order, the next generation of the Empire, but also for his teachings. There is a strong sense of the Force within her, she just doesn't know how to harness or understand it. That connection has brought a different kind of communication between her and Kylo Ren. Wherever the two are, they are able to communicate with one another and even see the other's surroundings. (152 min.)

—Karen Garcia

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI

What's it rated? R

What's it worth? Full Price

Where's it showing? Downtown Centre

Pick

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri is one shape-shifter of a movie. Is it a comedy, tragedy, or quest for vengeance, redemption, and catharsis? Director/writer Martin McDonagh (The Guard) manages to convince you it's all of the above.

We're dropped late into the aftermath of mother Mildred Hayes' (Frances McDormand, Hail, Caesar!, Moonrise Kingdom) grief and pain. Months have gone by since her daughter Angela (Kathryn Newton) was viciously raped and murdered while walking home one night in their small town. Still, local law enforcement has made no arrests and doesn't even have any suspects. While driving down a forgotten road just outside Ebbing, Mildred gets and idea and proceeds to march into town and pay for three billboards in a row painted red with big black letters that say "Raped while dying," "And still no arrests?" and "How come, Chief Willoughby?"

The writing is impeccably sharp, with searing lines thrown in at the most emotionally potent moments, and yet, there are so many laugh-out-loud moments, too, in this film that deals rather heavily in anger and sorrow. The acting is superb, particularly performances from McDormand, who plays Mildred as hardened and determined to find justice, and Harrelson as the seemingly hick police chief creates so much nuance and depth for his character. And yet, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri requires being OK with swallowing a hefty dose of imaginative realism. (115 min.)

—Ryah Cooley

12 STRONG

click to enlarge HORSE SOLDIERS In the aftermath of 9/11, Capt. Mitch Nelson (Chris Hemsworth) leads a U.S. Special Forces team into Afghanistan on a dangerous mission in 12 Strong. - PHOTO COURTESY OF WARNER BROS. PICTURES
  • Photo Courtesy Of Warner Bros. Pictures
  • HORSE SOLDIERS In the aftermath of 9/11, Capt. Mitch Nelson (Chris Hemsworth) leads a U.S. Special Forces team into Afghanistan on a dangerous mission in 12 Strong.

What's it rated? PG

What's it worth? Matinee

Where's it showing? Downtown Centre, Stadium 10, Park, Galaxy

Pick

Producer Jerry Bruckheimer (Armageddon, Pearl Harbor, Black Hawk Down) is known for backing big, bombastic films, but director Nicolai Fuglsig's 12 Strong isn't quite as obnoxious as many of Bruckheimer's previous movies. Instead, this film adaptation of Doug Stanton's book, Horse Soldiers, about the true story of a Special Forces team that joins Afghanistan's Northern Alliance in the war against the Taliban, allows viewers to breathe a little between explosions.

In fact, it begins rather quietly by establishing the family lives of the various soldiers, especially Capt. Mitch Nelson (Chris Hemsworth) and his second in command Hal Spencer (Michael Shannon). They think their warrior days are behind them, but then 9/11 occurs, and suddenly they find their 12-man squad chosen to be the first American forces set loose in Afghanistan. Most of their squad members are anonymously interchangeable though Michael Peña as Sam Diller and Trevante Rhodes as Ben Milo stand out.

Their mission is to join up with local warlord Gen. Dostrum (Navid Negahban), a fierce warrior with a grudge against Taliban leader Mullah Razzan (Numan Acar). Their endeavor is complicated by the fact that the so-called Northern Alliance isn't much of an alliance, and Gen. Dostrum and his warlord counterparts are as likely to fight each other as their shared enemy the Taliban.

It's worth noting, by the way, that in our politically correct world where it's hard to find an un-offensive and unambiguous movie enemy, the Taliban are the perfect foil. They're evil, and it's easy to root for them to get blown to smithereens. Also, unlike most of the best war films, 12 Strong isn't anti-war. The 12 soldiers are righteous patriots, and the Taliban deserves every headshot and blown-up tank they get. Yes, the film is jingoistic claptrap, but if you want to get your juices flowing and take your mind off all of the U.S.'s many misguided and unnecessary wars, 12 Strong ought to do the trick. It feels like we're fighting the good fight.

The story is rousing for a number of reasons. For one, the U.S. Army wasn't really prepared to fight in Afghanistan, and soldiers had to order their own cold weather gear from Cabela's, so these soldiers feel very gung-ho. After they're airlifted into the war zone, they discover that Gen. Dostrum and his militia are on horseback going up against tanks and missiles. Nelson and his men, most unfamiliar with horses, will have to ride into battle; these guys will adapt to the conditions they encounter. They're also grossly outnumbered, so they're badasses. What the Americans do have is the ability to call in precision airstrikes, and they do—a lot of them.

What 12 Strong depicts is one of the U.S.'s most amazing and unlikely military victories. The film's not interested in the larger ramifications of war. In fact, it barely touches on the psychological consequences of combat, and it's certainly not interested in the pros and cons of American neo-colonialism and "nation building." However, if you want to see some heroic Green Berets get some much-deserved payback for 9/11, strap in and take the ride. (130 min.) Δ

—Glen Starkey

New Times movie reviews were compiled by Arts Editor Ryah Cooley and others. You can contact her at rcooley@newtimesslo.com.

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