Tuesday, September 16, 2014     Volume: 29, Issue: 7
Signup
Featured Slideshow

Slideshow

Panga Boat Bust 9/6

Weekly Poll
Should police be allowed to use surplus military equipment?

Cheap or free gear for local police? Sounds good to me.
No. Police are meant to serve the people, not to threaten them.
If they use it properly I don’t see any reason why not, but I don’t feel comfortable seeing cops with assault rifles.
Nothing says democracy like a bayonet to the butt.

Vote! | Poll Results

RSS Feeds

Latest News RSS
Current Issue RSS

Special Features
Delicious
Search or post SLO County food and wine establishments

New Times / News

The following article was posted on November 21st, 2012, in the New Times - Volume 27, Issue 17 [ Submit a Story ]
The following articles were printed from New Times [newtimesslo.com] - Volume 27, Issue 17

Seven dogs die in boarding facility fire

BY NICK POWELL

A staff member living on site at Thousand Hills Pet Resort in San Luis Obispo awoke to see smoke and flames coming from several nearby kennels at about 6:40 a.m. on Nov. 19. According to facility manager Nicole Hern, the staffer responded immediately and was able to save some animals, but he was too late to help seven others, who lost their lives in the flames.


TRAGEDY AT DAYCARE FOR DOGS
Thousand Hills Pet Resort consists of 28 individual dog house structures, and more than a dozen play yards. The structures have electricity, which may have sparked the fire that recently killed seven dogs.
FILE PHOTO FROM FEBRUARY 2010 BY STEVE E. MILLER

CAL FIRE responded to the scene, but the fire was already out by the time they arrived. Based on the degree of damages to three kennels, Capt. Zach Nichols said it appeared the fire burned unnoticed for about an hour. Investigators have not yet been able to determine the fire’s cause, but no foul play is suspected at this time.

The doghouses were wired for lighting and heat, so an electrician also reviewed the debris but hadn’t found an ignition point as of press time, Hern said.

After the fire was put out, staffers spent the day delivering the bad news to the owners of deceased dogs and calling the rest of their clients to let them know their dogs were safe. They hadn’t yet reached the owner of one of the dogs that was lost as of press time. It was an emotional day, said Hern, who was too distraught to make the calls herself.

“My deep sorrow goes out to those who lost their animals,” Hern said. “When I learned we lost seven dogs, I felt like every one of them was mine.”