Friday, November 28, 2014     Volume: 29, Issue: 18
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New Times / News

The following article was posted on August 20th, 2014, in the New Times - Volume 29, Issue 4 [ Submit a Story ]
The following articles were printed from New Times [newtimesslo.com] - Volume 29, Issue 4

Residents appeal a Pismo Beach hotel project

BY RHYS HEYDEN

Just when it seemed Pismo Beach was set to move ahead with plans for a 104-room hotel opposite the Pismo Pier, an eleventh-hour appeal will likely send the project to the City Council for further review.

After months of wrangling with the Pismo Beach Planning Commission over the design of "The Inn at the Pier," local developer Dana Severy finally gained the unanimous support of the commission on July 22.

Even though Commissioner David Jewell dubbed Severy’s most recent plan “the greatest project I ever saw,” Pismo Beach residents Effie McDermott and Don Day filed an appeal of the hotel project on Aug. 1. The appeal was officially processed on Aug. 4.

“The development of this core downtown parcel is of such import to the future of the city, it is a [sic] unthinkable to allow its fate to be finalized without a hearing before our elected officials, the City Council,” the appeal states.

As approved by the commission, the hotel would have a rooftop pool, 104 rooms, 1,795 square feet of commercial retail space, a 2,150-square-foot meeting/convention room/dining space, a 775-square-foot business center, and a 132-space underground parking garage. Currently, the project site is a vacant dirt lot across from the Pismo Pier.

According to Associate Planner Mike Gruver, the city is still assessing whether McDermott and Day’s appeal is valid, as of Aug. 20. Gruver said there “weren’t really any grounds” stated in the extremely brief appeal.

“It’s still likely the City Council will have to take the appeal and put it on their agenda—either to grant the appeal and modify the project somehow, or to deny the appeal, thereby approving the project,” Gruver told New Times. “Either way, it’s very likely it will be opened up to a public hearing.”

Gruver added that the City Council hearing would most likely come sometime in October.